Jemez Springs — Soakers and Seekers

NOTE: I have been off the road for a month attending family visits, followed by over a week with no cell signal. Here is a post I wrote over Memorial day, before I stored the Winnie in Santa Fe to fly out. Old news now, but written, therefore published …

In addition to my mantra for 2018’s travels, “slow down, stay longer,” I also vow to visit more hot springs along the way. Soaking in natural spring water warmed in the bowels of Mother Earth is something I have always found to be soothing as well as restorative. In fact, I often joke that I need a bumper sticker that says “I Brake for Hot Springs.”

My best guide to finding little known places with rustic venues for soaking has been my “Hot Springs and Hot Pools of the Southwest” guidebook. I have used this resource to find places I otherwise might not have known about, such as Jacumba Hot Springs, CA or Rainbow Hot Springs in the forest of West Fork, CO.

The tiny "downtown" section of Jemez Springs is only about 3 blocks long, but has several restaurants (read wifi opportunities.)

The tiny “downtown” section of Jemez Springs is only about 3 blocks long, but has several restaurants (read wifi opportunities.)

This venue has a great patio with live entertainment on weekends.

This venue has a great patio with live entertainment on weekends.

The band during my visit played great music from my day -- Neil Young, James Taylor and even a couple of slow Hendrix tunes.

The band during my visit played great music from my day — Neil Young, James Taylor and even a couple of slow Hendrix tunes.

Where has all the vinyl gone? The band has an "office" in the back of the restaurant.

Where has all the vinyl gone? The band has an “office” in the back of the restaurant.

When planning my potential route for my northerly migration this year, I consult my hot springs guide to find a cluster of springs grouped around a town I have never even heard of before. Jemez Springs (pronounced “HAY-mez” Springs,) just west of Santa Fe, is a small hamlet at over 6,000 ft elevation near Valle Caldera National Monument, one of the newest National Park Service institutions. Once a hotbed of volcanic activity, there are still heated springs bubbling up from the earth’s hot core.

On arriving in Jemez Springs, I am surprised to find such scenic beauty in a place I have never heard of before. The narrow two lane road, Hwy 4, National Scenic Byway, cuts right through the tiny town, which backs up to the Jemez River. Steep canyon walls striarated with brilliant shades of pink, coral, and red sandstone flank both sides of the road and river, with numerous small Forest Service Campgrounds along the way. As the highway passes from the lower red rock canyon walls with dark green junipers and granny-apple colored cottonwoods, the scenery quickly changes as the road leaves the river and climbs up another 2,000 ft through the thick Santa Fe Forest of tall ponderosa pines.  Where arid desert meets cool forest, it’s two ecosystems for the price of one.

Lots of small galleries around, this one called "Weekends," in case you wondered when it's open.

Lots of small galleries around, this one called “Weekends,” in case you wondered when it’s open.

This place offers a great Prime Rib French Dip sandwich and crafts on draft.

This place offers a great Prime Rib French Dip sandwich and crafts on draft.

Downtown has a lot of charm for only 300 residents.

Downtown has a lot of charm for only 300 residents.

Los Ojos bar reminds me of "The Brick," the bar in the old TV show, "Northern Exposure." The characters even remind me of RuthAnn, Ed, Shelly, and Maurice Minnifield.

Los Ojos bar reminds me of “The Brick,” the bar in the old TV show, “Northern Exposure.” The characters even remind me of RuthAnn, Ed, Shelly, and Maurice Minnifield.

I arrive at my “first come/first serve” Forest Service campground on Tuesday, long before the Memorial Day maelstrom I expect for the upcoming three day weekend. I want to get there to secure my spot and hole up until the holiday blows over. I have seen on campground reviews that Verizon signal is weak and AT&T is near non-existent in the entire area, so I pick the campground nearest to town, thinking maybe I can squeeze out a bar with my booster. But as I approach Jemez Pueblo to the south, my AT&T and my heart drop simultaneously as the “No Service” indicator never waivers while driving through the reservation. How will I manage to stay through the weekend here with no signal? Not only am I already starting to exhibit signs of withdrawal, but I am not able to research any other options.

A fellow GEO Tracker cult follower approaches me in the campground and tells me it’s only 1.7 miles up the road to get an AT&T signal. It’s not even been three hours since I parked, but I am off for a fix. This could be a long weekend…and it’s only Tuesday.

The drive through Jemez Pueblo and Jemez Springs is very scenic.

The drive through Jemez Pueblo and Jemez Springs is very scenic.

My lovely campsite, which i keep extending day upon day.

My lovely campsite, which I keep extending day upon day.

The site is so pleasant, I hardly miss my social media addiction. A perfrect place to read a book by day and the stars by night.

The site is so pleasant, I hardly miss my social media addiction. A perfect place to read a book by day and read the stars by night.

Full moon rising over the mesa.

Full moon rising over the mesa.

I can hear the Jemez River running right beside me. It lulls me to sleep every night in place of Facebook. ;-)

I can hear the Jemez River running right beside me. It lulls me to sleep every night in place of Facebook. ;-)

But a couple of days pass, and I soon learn there is more going on in Jemez Springs than I have given credit. It’s another one of those places like Winthrop, WA, where the entertainment value far exceeds what you would expect from a town with a population of a mere 250 people. Yes, there are hot springs. But there are also some good restaurants with patios offering live entertainment. A few small Inns and galleries. And a very impressive Library with “stacks,” DVD rentals, comfortable chairs, and free wifi.

There is also the annual Memorial Day Arts & Crafts fair happening in the adjacent Native American Pueblo. There is music, ceremonial dancing, and just like hotdogs in summer, there is the token Navajo fry bread!

26th Annual Jemez Red Rocks Arts & Crafts Show

26th Annual Jemez Red Rocks Arts & Crafts Show

Arts & Crafts show includes performances by local tribes. Woman in the back is 80 year old mother.

Arts & Crafts show includes performances by local tribes. Woman in the back is their 80 year old mother.

Several tribes performed throughout the day.

Several tribes performed throughout the day.

These two guys costumes were beautiful with all the feathers.

These two guys costumes were beautiful with all the feathers.

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Hand carved crafts including Native American cradleboard.

Hand carved crafts including Native American cradleboard.

Beautiful hand carved Native American flutes.

Beautiful hand carved Native American flutes.

What Native American assembly is complete without fry bread?

What Native American assembly is complete without fry bread?

I asked this little woman if I could take her photo. When I went tp pay for my fry bread, she asked me if I would send her a copy. Expecting an email addres, when she handed me the slip of paper it had a PO Box. LOL!

I asked this little woman if I could take her photo. When I went to pay for my fry bread, she asked me if I would send her a copy. I was expecting an email address, when she handed me the slip of paper it had a PO Box. LOL!

Empty calories, but when do I ever get to eat fry bread??

Empty calories, but when do I ever get to eat fry bread??

They have some gorgeous red rock canyons in their pueblo, but hiking is forbidden there without a $7 tour.

They have some gorgeous red rock canyons in their pueblo, but hiking is forbidden there without a $7 tour. I would have paid the seven bucks, but you can’t go without the guide.

Another curiosity of Jemez Springs, it once supported not one but two monasteries. Although the Christian Monastery, Cor Jesu, former home of the “Handmaids of the Precious Blood” was sold to the Jemez Pueblo, the Bodhi Manda Zen Center still exists along the main road, focusing on the Japanese version of Buddhism. On the night of each full moon, they open the center to visitors to sit in meditation and watch the full moon rise over the mesa, followed by a soak in their natural hot springs alongside the river. Although I have yet to master my “monkey mind” through meditation, I attended the sitting, as there is no greater focal point in my mind than that of the full moon! Never mind soaking after dark in the moonlight!

The woman at the Pueblo Visitor Center tells me to take a drive 5 miles down the road. I am stunned to find this beautiful canyon that is not visible from the main road.

The woman at the Pueblo Visitor Center tells me to take a drive 5 miles up the road. I am stunned to find this beautiful canyon that is not visible from the main road.

Five miles down are the two Gilman Tunnels.

Five miles down are the two Gilman Tunnels. (Note the first of two, just left of center.)

The tunnels were built in 1924 Santa Fe Northwestern Railway which was used to haul lumber from the Jemez Mountains through the canyon.

The tunnels were built in 1924 Santa Fe Northwestern Railway which was used to haul lumber from the Jemez Mountains through the canyon.

The road through the canyon follows the Rio Guadalupe.

The road through the canyon follows the Rio Guadalupe.

While in Jemez Springs, I visited four other hot springs in addition to the natural spring at Bodhi Manda; two commercial springs, and two natural springs in the forest, each with its own brand of ambiance.

Next up …a tour of each of these unique hot springs visits…

15 thoughts on “Jemez Springs — Soakers and Seekers

  1. You are making me miss New Mexico. We visited the springs on our trip home one year, but didn’t stay. It was beautiful. Would love to just hang in that town for a week like you did

  2. We loved our short visit to New Mexico three years ago. We detoured through the park lands on our way from Pie Town to Albuquerque. Awesome ride.

  3. I think you found a perfect spot for the upcoming meteor shower. You’ve taken us on another wonderful vacation spot, to add to the ToDo list, which keeps getting longer!

  4. Gosh that is some beautiful country.
    I don’t think I want to know how those tribesmen got hold of those feathers………. :-/

  5. Great to hear from you:) Looks like a very interesting town. We passed through years ago on a motorcycle trip. Isn’t it amazing how every little town has so much to offer. We have yet to visit a place we didn’t find something new to take in. Thanks for sharing the beautiful scenery. I am missing the rocks and hiking.

  6. Gotta love places that are like stepping back in time. The music, the atmosphere and the shops/bars you described made me think of that. In fact, you stepped back so far you were pre-cell phone! Glad you enjoyed it, looks very relaxing!

  7. Oh, Suzanne, you had me at the mention of my old friends RuthAnn, Ed, Shelly and Maurice (well..you know what I mean). At this very moment I am sitting amidst a pile of maps, brochures and travel books on New Mexico. Why? Because, yay!, I’m trip planning a month long sojourn to NM this October, hauling my new-to-me 14′ travel trailer along behind me. Thus far I’ve been concentrating my journey to areas south of ABQ, but it looks like I’ll def have to put Jemez Springs (and the Los Ojos bar) on the list. I’m tickled you’ll be doing posts on other hot springs in the area! You and your travels continue to be a great force of inspiration…thank you so much for taking the time to share your path of adventure with us (especially moi). :-) I can’t wait to read more about the area I’ll be traveling to in a couple months!

  8. Guess I haven’t spent enough time in New Mexico. But I love my hot springs books for both SW and NW. Looks like a sweet place to hang out, if you can handle being disconnected.

  9. Jemez Springs has now been added to my travel list. The Bodhi Manda Zen Center sounds like my kind of place. Stepping aways from social media for a bit is always a good thing. I have been doing just that this summer.

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