Getting the Shot in Guanajuat-Oh!

Just about an hour drive west of San Miguel de Allende is another UNESCO World Heritage town, Guanajuato.  But unique from every other town you will find in Mexico, Guanajato is more “European” than Mexican.   The town was originally founded all the way back in the 1500’s.  Having been built around the silver mining trade, the town still has some active mines.  These mines lie buried within the steep hills, flanking the main thoroughfare.  If you’re looking for a destination to stay fit, this is it!   Most of the roads Continue reading

Closing Doors

In years past, San Miguel de Allende has been a regular destination for National Geographic’s week-long photography workshops. While buildings in the main section of historic “Centro” in San Miguel are restricted by the Regulation of Construction to shades of ocre and earth tones, vivid accent colors abound in the form of bougainvillea, hibiscus, and greenery planted in brightly colored pottery. But no accent is more intriguing than the doors of San Miguel. There’s even a book of photography featuring only photos of the ornately carved doors. Continue reading

Waltz Across Texas

The Winnie traveled across ten different states in 2016, the last being the least desirable. No offense to my family, athough Texas is my birthplace, anyone who knows me knows I’m not a fan for many reasons. If my Mom and niece would only relocate, I’d be like Thelma and Louise, driving across the four contiguous states just to avoid driving through it.

It’s 500 miles from the state line to the family farm, every one of them Continue reading

Soaks, Snow, and a Sea of Sand

The US Dept of Interior recently posted on Facebook, “Moonlight brightens snowy dunes at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in Colorado. Experience the park after dark by stargazing, listening for owls along the foothills or going for a full moon walk on the dunes. Cold temperatures are the norm in winter, so bundle up with warm clothing and sturdy footwear for an unforgettable nighttime adventure.”

I find this an odd promotion, considering the park is miles from nowhere, and they have closed the one and only campground within the park.  Continue reading

The Roads to Chaco

I’ll admit I’d never even heard of Chaco Culture National Historic Park until I visited Mesa Verde National Park in 2015 when a Ranger on one of the guided tours said “If you think this is something, you should visit Chaco Canyon!”    So to learn that it was once considered the center of all ancestral Puebloan culture came as quite a surprise.   How could this ancient hub of civilization, just one state over from my childhood home, be a complete unknown to me?  After all the road trips of my youth across the great southwest, Continue reading

If A Tree Falls in the Forest…

NOTE:  Thanks for all your wonderful comments and support on my “Dear Mr. President” post.   I’ll get back to life in Mexico soon, but first, I have a few posts to catch up on, lest I forget the last days of my southerly winter migration…

If a tree falls in the forest and I can’t remember seeing it, does it still count?  If I visited a national park but can’t remember a thing about it, does it still count?

Anyone who knows me knows that I’m a national park junkie.   I have lofty aspirations to visit all 59 with the official “Park” status. Continue reading

Dear Mr. President…Come Take a Ride with Me

For the past month, I’ve been traveling across Mexico, hitting a few places I’ve never been. Riding on Mexican buses is one of my favorite pastimes of Mexico, particularly the “in country” buses. They defy all stereotypes of the Latin American “chicken bus.” Instead they are luxury buses with reclining seats, elevating footrests, AC power ports, seat-back video screens showing movies, documentaries, and video games. The one I rode yesterday was a giant double-decker with three seats across – one on the left and two on the right. It even had suede leather seats, cup holders, and wood grain accents. Less than thirty bucks will get you a ride between most cities, including a ham and cheese croissant and a coke. Continue reading

One Last Look Over the Rim

Just how long can one stretch out a story about the Grand Canyon, one might ask?  Well, longer than the average visitor spends on the edge of the rim…

I decide to stay one more day on the snowy South Rim, after all, no one seems to notice that the Winnie is taking up space in the empty Backcountry Office parking lot.  Continue reading